Tag Archives: life

Musings of a New Migrant

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It’s my second month in a new country. It was my dream to go here since childhood, as I have heard good things about it from my relatives who migrated here. Clean surroundings, good benefits. Yes it’s all true. But it’s not all there is.

First, why I am here? Like everyone else, I dream of a better future. It’s not just for me but I am thinking of helping my relatives go here if I become a citizen. I am also thinking about the future of my kids, if and when I have them. I am currently single but taken. I left my heart at my home country and as of this moment, I am in a long distance relationship. That’s the one thing that truly pains my heart, to be away from the one I love. But we are both hoping and praying that we will be together again. His profession is also one that is in-demand in the country where I am in now.

My first few weeks was a breeze. I was living the dream! I now live with my relatives who told good things about this country. And now I can really see that they are reaping the rewards – they have a nice house, cars, and their kids studied here so they have good jobs too.

I started applying for jobs. I went for an interview with the recruiter, but oh, the rules here are so different. I am not in demand as I was in my home country.

Yes, this is the reality of being a migrant. I am in a different world. Now, my biggest dilemma is finding a job. My faith is being tested. It’s a rollercoaster of emotions – being homesick, sad, anxious, afraid.

But God never leaves us. He sends us people. My friend who is in another country is not a migrant, she is on work visa. She reminded me that I won half the battle, I am here, I got a legitimate visa to work, something others only dream about.

I also got people to cheer me up – people who grew up here who belongs to the same organization. They are citizens here but we have the same cultural roots.

I met a woman on the train who told me of how she started out, not also in her field but is now enjoying her work and she is attending trainings to enhance her skills. She said “Wherever you are, you can progress. It is up to you to make the move.” Such wisdom and eye-opener.

I also met a classmate who told his struggles on finding himself after their family migrated. But he said, after all the struggles, all in all he is happy that their parents decided to migrate, as they now live a more comfortable life. And when his mom got sick, the government also took care of the medical bills – something that our home country cannot provide.

Of course, I am truly grateful that my relatives here are very good people who provide my basic needs. I don’t know how to repay them really. But hopefully in time, I can pay it back (and pay it forward to others) in any way.

So after hearing these stories, I am inspired to move forward in job hunting. There are still fears, uncertainties. But whether I succeed here or not, the lessons I am learning about myself are priceless.